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Addressing Youth Crime By Teaching Social Skills

July 13, 2012 11:48:04 am
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Photo by Gideon Tsang, via Flickr

Enrolling teens in certain non-academic programs may decrease violent-crime arrests by as much as 44 percent while students are enrolled, according to a new study by the University of Chicago Crime Lab.

Researchers analyzed the impact of enrolling 2,740 disadvantaged seventh through 10th grade boys in Becoming A Man (BAM)—Sports Edition, a Chicago program which focuses on developing cognitive skills related to emotional regulation and other social behaviors. In addition to the reduction in violent-crime arrests, the study found an increase in schooling outcomes that could translate to a 10 to 23 percent increase in graduation rates among participants.

The study estimates the dollar-valued benefits of enrolling teens in such programs as between three and 31 times the $1,100 invested per participant.

Read the study here.

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Posted by Darcia Mortiboy
Tuesday, July 31, 2012 11:03

Great findings! Just another reason to keep school counselors around our youth!! A huge focus of our curriculum, individual counseling and group counseling is teaching social skills. :)

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