Want to read more? Subscribe Now or Sign In
Hide ( X )
  • THE CRIME REPORT - Your Complete Criminal Justice Resource

  • Investigative News Network
  • Welcome to the Crime Report. Today is

Crime and Justice News

< <    1 2 3 4 5 6 .. 1615   > >

3/4 Of Local Residents Agree Media Made Ferguson Situation Worse

Three-fourths of St. Louis County, Mo., residents agreed after last month's fatal police killing of Michael Brown that the news media “contributed to making the situation in Ferguson worse,” says the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Of those criticizing the media coverage in Ferguson, 50 percent were African American and 81 percent were white.

The survey was conducted by the Remington Research Group on two days this month of 604 residents. Ferguson is a city within St. Louis County.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

Anti-Government "Survivalist" Sought In PA State Trooper's Killing

A man described as a "survivalist," a trained marksman with antigovernment leanings, was the gunman who killed one state police officer and injured a second in an ambush outside the barracks here last week, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer. Police said they identified Eric Matthew Frein, 31, from documents he left in a Jeep he abandoned about two miles from the barracks, where he ambushed Cpl. Bryon K. Dickson and Trooper Alex Douglass on Friday. Dickson was killed and Douglass critically injured.

Frein, who lived with his parents, was at large and considered extremely dangerous, possibly armed with a high-powered rifle that looks like an AK-47, police said. Scores of officers fanned out across the region, and police scrambled to respond repeatedly to reports of shots being fired, but nothing led to Frein. State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan said investigators believe Frein did not target Dickson and Douglass specifically, but law enforcement officers in general. "He made statements about wanting to kill law enforcement officers and to commit mass acts of murder," Noonan said. Frein's father, E. Michael Frein, is a retired Army major who served for 28 years.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

ISIS Encourages Lone Wolf Bomb Attacks In U.S.; Bratton: Threat Credible

Members of ISIS forums are encouraging “lone wolf” bomb attacks in some of America’s most high-profile tourist locations: New York, Las Vegas and Texas, reports Vocativ.com. A post in an ISIS message board, created three weeks ago and resurfacing this week, includes a comprehensive guide to building pipe bombs using easily obtained materials like match heads, sugar and Christmas lights. Titled “To the Lone Wolves in America: How to Make a Bomb in Your Kitchen, to Create Scenes of Horror in Tourist Spots and Other Targets,” the post suggests attacking Times Square and Las Vegas in particular, but also says tourist sites in Texas and transit stations throughout the U.S. would make good targets.

New York Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said the online tutorial aimed at provoking an American attack was a major turn for the new terror organization. “This is the first time ISIS has used this medium to inspire a “lone wolf” type attack,” Bratton said. “We are quite concerned, as you would expect, with the capabilities of ISIS much more than Al Qaeda ever was able to project their ability to use social media to try and spread their recruitment efforts and try to inspire.” Bratton said the threat of ISIS inspiring bloodshed on U.S. soil is considered plausible.

 

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

Holder To Finish 93 U.S. Attorney Visits; How Much Longer Will He Stay?

Is Attorney General Eric Holder readying his exit strategy? The Washington Post reported earlier that he had decided to stay in his job through the fall midterm elections but that he would not commit beyond the end of the year. Now, the Post says his travel schedule this month could give another clue to his intentions.

One of his major goals was to visit all 93 U.S. attorney’s offices. There are only three left on the list, and he’s traveling to two of them this week, in Louisville and Lexington, Ky. He’s saving for last the office nearest and dearest to him at the William J. Nealon Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Scranton, Pa. Holder and Judge Nealon, 87, have been close for many years, after Holder, then a young Justice Department prosecutor, handled a major corruption case in Scranton. He’s going to Scranton at the end of this month, so that’s one more initiative checked off.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

Unpopular Court Rulings In Criminal Cases Prompt Drives Against Judges

Shortly before Christmas in 2000, brothers Reginald and Jonathan Carr went on a brutal robbery, rape and murder spree that left five people dead and traumatized Wichita, Kansas's largest city. The brothers were sentenced to death, but in July, the Kansas Supreme Court set aside the death sentences for the notorious killers, shocking many Kansans and adding fuel to a debate over how justices on the state’s highest court should be chosen, Stateline reports. To state Senate Majority Leader Terry Bruce, a Republican,  the court’s decision to overturn the brothers’ capital murder convictions is only the latest example of the court defying public sentiment, and a compelling argument for why Kansas residents should have a more powerful voice in choosing their top judges.

In several states, including Kansas and Florida, state legislators have been debating how justices for state supreme courts should be chosen. Meanwhile, elections to win or retain court seats increasingly have become big-money contests, with political parties and special interests pouring in campaign dollars to try to help elect or unseat justices in more than a dozen states in recent years. The stakes are high: State supreme courts review local courts’ criminal and civil verdicts and the constitutionality of state laws, and about 95 percent of all legal cases are filed in state courts. Politicians like Bruce argue that the courts should more closely reflect public opinion. Advocates of an independent judiciary argue that justices should be able to make decisions free of political and special-interest pressure. They warn that forcing judges to curry political favor or compile huge campaign war chests to win elections threatens that independence.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

Run On Guns, Ammo Creates Windfall For Wildlife In NC, Other States

The run on guns and ammunition that began with President Obama’s election and intensified after the Newtown, Ct., school shooting has created a windfall for state wildlife programs in North Carolina, reports the Raleigh News & Observer. Receipts from a federal excise tax that dates back to the Great Depression have soared, pumping millions into wildlife research, game land projects and hunter education in North Carolina and other states. The state got nearly $20 million from the firearms and ammunition tax this year, more than three times as much as it did in 2007.

State wildlife officials say the extra money has made up for cuts in state funding and allowed them to take on new projects, including construction of parking lots, roads, new signs and boundary markers on some of the 2 million acres of game lands managed by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. The excise tax on guns and ammunition dates 1937, when Congress passed the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act, better known as the Pittman-Robertson Act after its main sponsors. The law was aimed at restoring game and other wildlife and had the strong support of hunters and the firearms industry. Much of the Pittman-Robertson money that has flowed to North Carolina in recent years has gone for projects that directly benefit those who pay the excise tax. The state, which historically operated only one public shooting range, will soon have four – with three more on the way.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

Texas Set To Execute Woman For Boy's Death A Decade Ago

A Texas woman is scheduled to be executed today for the starvation death of her girlfriend’s son, reports the Texas Tribune. Lisa Ann Coleman, 38, would be the the sixth woman and 517th person to be executed in Texas since 1982, the year the state reinstated the death penalty after a 1976 Supreme Court decision that allowed states to resume capital punishment. She would be the ninth person executed in Texas this year.

Coleman was living with her girlfriend, Marcella Williams, in an Arlington, Tx., apartment complex when paramedics discovered the starved corpse of a 9-year-old boy on July 26, 2004. He had been beaten, bore 250 scars and weighed 35 pounds at the time of his death, about half the typical weight for a child his age. Both Coleman and the boy’s mother were charged with capital murder. Williams pleaded guilty in 2006 to avoid facing the death penalty at trial. Child Protective Services records showed Williams and her son had been the subject of at least six child abuse investigations. Coleman attorney John Stickels is appealing her death sentence based on how his client was initially charged.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

Do Police Race Disparities Suggest "Hundreds Of Potential Fergusons"?

What happened in Ferguson could happen elsewhere in in the U.S., says the Christian Science Monitor. That’s the message from experts on race relations and from an analysis of census data after the killing of Michael Brown and resulting protests. Ferguson may be an extreme example, but it’s part of a larger pattern in which many communities have police forces that don’t come close to mirroring the racial composition of the populations they serve.

How many “other Fergusons” are there in America? To some extent, that’s a question answered only under the stress of events. Numbers tracked by the Census Bureau hint at stark racial imbalances that persist. “I would argue that there are hundreds of potential Fergusons throughout the United States,” says Matthew Whitaker, director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Arizona State University. “It only takes a gunshot or a death for these simmering feelings to emerge.” From Ann Arbor, Mi., to Roanoke, Va., some metro areas have no black police officers, even though blacks account for 10 percent or more of their populations. Even in the many metro areas where racial imbalances aren’t so visible, African Americans are generally concerned about things such as racial bias in policing and criminal justice.

Read full entry »

User Comments (0 )

< <    1 2 3 4 5 6 .. 1615   > >

TCR at a Glance

Is GIS Effective in Policing?

new & notable September 19, 2014

Almost no research has been conducted into the effectiveness of Geographic Information Systems by police, according to a new Sam Houston ...

BJS: Violent Crime Declined in 2013

September 18, 2014

The nation's violent crime rate fell slightly last year, possibly signaling a return to a decades-long trend, according to the U.S. Burea...

Examining "Collateral Consequence Laws"

new & notable September 15, 2014

Laws that restrict access to public services for former inmates may relate to lower rates of return to prison, but there's incomplete dat...