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2,500 Teens In Texas Database Of Suspected Child Abusers

About 2,500 people under age 18 were added in fiscal 2009 to a Texas database of people accused of child abuse and neglect, records that can be shared with other states, says the Texas Tribune. The "central registry" was created in the mid-1990 to give a variety of people and agencies, from child welfare workers to certain job placement offices, a central location to run comprehensive background checks or to aid investigations.

It is largely made up of people who aren’t convicted criminals or registered sex offenders, from the negligent parent whose child died in a hot car to a group home operator who hit a disabled child. The problem, say critics, is that it includes the names of thousands of juveniles who may have no idea they’re even on it and, unlike a criminal proceeding, have had no chance to contest the designation. State spokesman Patrick Crimmins says that, “If a child has a history of sexually acting out, sexually abusing other children, physically abusing other children or otherwise engaging in behaviors that create safety concerns, staff takes steps to ensure these children and any other children in the placement are safe.”

http://www.texastribune.org/texas-state-agencies/child-protective-services/texas-keeps-registry-of-kids-who-abuse-kids/print/

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Mistaken Convictions Suspected In Many Shaken-Baby-Syndrome Cases

A group of lawyers that has succeeded in exonerating hundreds of people based on DNA evidence is mounting 20 to 25 appeals of shaken-baby convictions, reports the New York Times "No one wants child abuse," says Keith Findley, a lawyer for the Wisconsin Innocence Project. "But we should not be prosecuting and convicting people in shaken-baby cases right now, based on the triad of symptoms, without other evidence of abuse. If the medical community can’t agree about all the conflicting data and research, how is a jury supposed to reach a conclusion that’s beyond a reasonable doubt?”

Between 1,200 and 1,400 U.S. children sustain head injuries attributed to abuse each year. Most of them are under a year old. Usually, there’s not much dispute that the children were abused, because doctors discover other signs of mistreatment — cuts, bruises, burns, fractures — or a history of such injuries. Law-enforcement authorities believe there are about 200 shaken-baby prosecutions annually. In an estimated 50 percent to 75 percent of them, the only medical evidence of shaken-baby syndrome is the triad of internal symptoms: subdural and retinal hemorrhage and brain swelling.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/06/magazine/06baby-t.html?ref=us&pagewanted=print

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AMBER Alerts For Missing Children Going On Facebook

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and the Department of Justice are teaming with Facebook to create AMBER Alert pages to help in the search for missing children, reports USA Today. There will be a Facebook page for each state, plus the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. "I think it's really a logical and exciting use of the medium," said Ernie Allen, president of the center for missing children.

 "It's one more avenue to reach the public and reach the younger generation," said Laurie Robinson, assistant attorney general in the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Justice Programs, which is the national coordinator of the AMBER Alert program. Facebook users will be able to opt-in to receive posts in their news feed when an AMBER Alert is issued in their area. "It's targeted geographically," Allen says. "You're not going to be inundated with them." There are 120 AMBER Alert plans across the U.S. and others worldwide. Each state or territory's AMBER Alert coordinator initiates the alert through the Emergency Alert System, and the center issues secondary alerts, such as messages on billboards, mobile phones and now, the new Facebook pages. From 2005 to 2009, 98.5 percent of AMBER Alerts cases have been resolved.

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40% Of MA Schools Fail To File Required Anti-Bullying Plans

Forty percent of Massachusetts school districts have not filed bullying-prevention plans, despite a Dec. 31 deadline to comply with a new law that seeks to improve protection for students, the Boston Globe reports. The law was passed amid urgent calls for action following the suicide of bullied student Phoebe Prince on Jan. 14. It requires schools to adopt clear procedures for reporting and investigating cases of bullying, as well as methods for preventing retaliation against those who report problems.

The new measure has sparked widespread debate about complex aspects of a longtime social problem, including how to define bullying, whose responsibility it is to stamp it out, and how schools can control conflict on the Internet. The law does not specify penalties for failing to file a plan by the deadline. Robert Trestan of the Anti-Defamation League was troubled by the numbers, given the publicity surrounding the new law and the fact that school districts have had since May to comply. “To change the culture, everyone needs to be on board,’’ he said. “Parents are in a position to hold schools accountable, and if your district doesn’t have a policy, you need to step up and ask why not.’’

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Fingerprint Scanners Planned In WI Child Care Centers

It looks like Big Brother wants to put an end to child care fraud in Wisconsin, says Milwaukee Journal Sentinel columnist Eugene Kane. The state has approved a $1 million pilot program to install fingerprint scanners in child care centers to combat fraud in the Wisconsin Shares subsidy program. Although many Americans are concerned about technology's encroaching threats to their privacy, that doesn't seem to apply when it comes to black children in Milwaukee.

The Wisconsin Shares program was ripped off for millions of dollars by some corrupt child care providers who used state funds meant for poor children and families to line their own pockets. The Journal Sentinel's Pulitzer Prize-winning series "Cashing in on Kids" pulled the covers off much of the abuse, including shoddy oversight by state bureaucrats that allowed the scandal to happen. Because a large part of the abuse involved some providers being paid for taking care of children who never showed up at the center, the fingerprinting policy was deemed a good way to track attendance and eliminate fraud. Still, for some in town, the idea of scanning fingerprints of young children just seemed wrong. "We are not going to allow our children to be branded like cattle!" said an African-American mother on Facebook. A caller on black radio in Milwaukee said, "It's like putting black children 'on paper' before they even become criminals!" he said, alluding to the term used when someone is caught up in the criminal justice system.

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Notorious Oregon Child Killer Downs Due For Parole Hearing

Elizabeth Diane Downs, Oregon's notorious child-killer, is due for another parole hearing tomorrow, The Oregonian reports. Sentenced in 1984, Downs is serving a life sentence plus 55 years for killing her 7-year-old daughter severely wounding her 8-year-old daughter Christie Ann and 3-year-old son. Her story is told in the movie "Small Sacrifices," based on a book by Ann Rule.

She complains that when the movie is shown on television, "people want to kill me."  Downs is arguing that her sentence is invalid because it was based on a diagnosis of "severe narcissistic personality disorder." That condition is no longer recognized by U.S. psychiatrists.

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Jail Populations Dip; Unclear If One-Year Drop Is Trend

Local jail populations are declining around the nation, says a Pew Charitable Trusts study quoted by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The high cost of keeping people in jail has communities looking at alternatives to incarceration that still maintain public safety, says "Local Jails: Working to reduce populations and costs," from the trust's Philadelphia Research Initiative. County jails are used mostly to hold defendants awaiting trial and convicted offenders serving short-term sentences or awaiting transfers to other prisons.

The Pew report found average jail population in more populous communities nationwide down 2.3 percent in 2009 from the previous year. "It is too soon to tell whether this one-year dip is the start of a new trend, but many jurisdictions seem intent on reversing the population growth of prior years," the study said. The number of prisoners in Pittsburgh's Allegheny County jail dropped by an even larger amount, said Warden Ramon Rustin. Jail commitments in 2009 totaled 18,141, down almost 11 percent from 2008's total of 20,383. Rustin credited the county court's Pretrial Services Department for helping to reduce the number of prisoners sent to the jail. Last year's decline in local jail commitments follows a decade of increases. Between 1999 and 2008, jail populations climbed 30 percent nationally.

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DE Jury Finds Local Parish Liable In $30 Million Priest-Abuse Award

In a ruling that likely will have far-reaching implications for about 150 priest sex abuse cases pending or tied up in bankruptcy court, a Dover, Del., jury found that St. Elizabeth Roman Catholic parish was grossly negligent in its failure to properly supervise then-priest Francis DeLuca and is responsible for at least $3 million of $30 million in damages awarded to John M. Vai, who repeatedly was molested as a teenager in the 1960s, reports the Wilmingon News-Journal. The parish also may end up owing Vai more after the Kent County Superior Court jury rules on potential punitive damages.

On the stand, Vai, 58, told a jury that his case was not about the money but about getting the truth out and getting compensation for the loss of his childhood. Vai said Wednesday he was pleased with the outcome and that the jury believed his account. "Personally, I feel some of the weight is relieved," he said. Wilmington Bishop W. Francis Malooly issued a brief statement in which he again apologized on behalf of the diocese to Vai and all other victims of childhood sexual abuse at the hands of a priest. He also said he was "disappointed that the jury found the people of St. Elizabeth liable for the acts of Francis DeLuca" and said it is "unfortunate" that they will have to pay for DeLuca's "criminal and sinful acts" from more than 40 years ago.

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Iowans Frustrated By Enduring Oddity In Student Abuse Reporting

Iowa law does not require school districts to report student abuse when it happens from their own teachers — even though licensed school employees are considered mandatory reporters of abuse, reports the Des Moines Register. The way districts handle abuse cases stems from an opinion by Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller's office regarding the state's mandatory reporting law. In 1979, Brent Appel, then an assistant attorney general and now an Iowa Supreme Court justice, said the law pertains to abuse by people responsible for the care of children. That does not include teachers, he wrote.

The decision and lack of subsequent action by lawmakers made Iowa the only state to keep parents or others from reporting child abuse by teachers to the Iowa Department of Human Services, said Kathy Collins, a retired lawyer with the Iowa Department of Education. Parents can, however, report alleged abuse by teachers to police. If parents contact the Department of Human Services regarding teacher abuse, the agency refers them to police, a department spokesman said. "Many made it known to their legislators that they were not happy," Collins said. "The teacher is obligated to file a complaint against (the parent), but the shoe doesn't fit the other foot."

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IRS Won't Inform Law Enforcement Of Child Abductor Data

Because of privacy laws, the Internal Revenue Service won't give law enforcement information that could lead to apprehending child abductors, says the New York Times. The laws, enacted in the 1970s to prevent Watergate-era abuses of confidential taxpayer information, have exceptions allowing the IRS to turn over information in child support cases and to help federal agencies determine whether an applicant qualifies for income-based federal benefits.

Guidelines on handling of criminal cases pose obstacles for parents and investigators pursuing a child abductor — even when the taxpayer in question is a fugitive and the subject of a felony warrant. "It’s one of those areas where you would hope that common sense would prevail," said Ernie Allen of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. "We are talking about people who are fugitives, who have criminal warrants against them. And children who are at risk." About 200,000 family abductions are reported each year in the U.S., most stemming from custody disputes between estranged spouses. About 12,000 last longer than six months and involve parental abductors who assume false identities and travel to escape detection.

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