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Study: 'Assault Pistols' Making Comeback

January 30, 2013 10:39:38 am
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An Uzi pistol. Photo by Rama, via Wikimedia Commons

A study by the non-profit Violence Policy Center, which advocates for stricter gun laws, highlights more than 20 examples of so-called “assault pistols” currently marketed in the United States.

The study notes that many of the pistols were made illegal under the now-expired assault weapons ban, including the Uzi, MAC-10 and Calico pistols. Two of the most popular weapons, the AK-47 and AR-15 pistols, offer power similar to that of the nation’s most popular assault rifles, the study claims.

“Not since the late 1980s and early 1990s has there been such a wide selection of assault pistols available for sale in the United States,” the study’s authors wrote.

The Violence Policy Center claims that AK-47 pistols are a ‘weapon of choice’ among illegal gun traffickers who bring weapons from the United States into Mexico.

Read the study HERE.

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Posted by Pete G
Tuesday, February 05, 2013 02:57

To characterize this VPC document as a study is disingenuous. Aside from the embarrassing contortions of language in the document, the actual substance of the document is a little more than Google search.

The Crime Report doesn’t do itself justice by republishing a press release nearly verbatim.

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