Want to read more? Subscribe Now or Sign In
Hide ( X )
  • THE CRIME REPORT - Your Complete Criminal Justice Resource

  • Investigative News Network
  • Welcome to the Crime Report. Today is

Articles

Locked Up Without a Key in New Orleans

September 14, 2012 07:30:33 am

Inmates at Orleans Parish Prison. Photo by Editor B, via Flickr

Seven years after Katrina, New Orleans’ criminal justice system is in dismal shape, according to reporting by Karen Houppert in The Nation. In the first of a series investigating the “failed promise” of Gideon v Wainwright—to mark the upcoming 50-year anniversary of the landmark 1963 Supreme Court ruling that states are required to provide free legal aid to defendants who otherwise cannot pay for counsel—Houppert looks at the Orleans Parish Prison, where 230 defendants have been awaiting legal help, in some cases for over a year.

Houppert, a 2012 John Jay/Public Welfare Foundation Reporting Fellow, found that as federal help to New Orleans has dried up since the hurricane, the fiscal crisis in the city’s criminal justice system has hit hardest on those who need help most: impoverished defendants. The picture across the country, she writes, is not much better. To read the opening piece of the series, which was supported by the Investigative Fund of the Nation Institute, please click HERE.

« Article List
No Comments yet

TCR at a Glance

Prop 47: The Debate Continues

March 23, 2015

Just four months after Californians passed a landmark referendum to reform the criminal code, they’re immersed in a debate over its...

New Indictments in Narco Freedom Case

March 20, 2015

Operators of one of New York’s largest drug treatment programs are accused of exploiting substance abusers in a wide-ranging &ldquo...

The Missing Public Defender

March 19, 2015

More lawyers for poor defendants would reduce pretrial detention---and save money, says a new report.

Who Follows Crime News?

new & notable March 18, 2015

A Pew Research Center study of three cities finds urban black and Hispanic residents pay more attention to crime news than white residents